Resources

Electronic

About Kids Health – a website developed by Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto, Ontario. This website provides a variety of helpful information regarding children’s health conditions but has a particularly insightful section on pediatric pain.  http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/ResourceCentres/Pain/Pages/default.aspx

American Pain Society – This website provides useful resources for people who are in pain and for those who want to learn more about pain. It also provides useful definitions for recurrent, chronic, and acute pain. http://www.ampainsoc.org/resources/

Centre for Pediatric Pain Research, IWK Health Centre – The Centre for Pediatric Pain Research at the IWK Health Centre provides useful information for children and his/her families. It also provides helpful tips to reduce pain for children undergoing immunizations.
http://pediatric-pain.ca/content/Families

Help for Headaches – This website was developed by a non-profit organization in Ontario, Canada and provides information specific to headache pain (symptoms, treatments, triggers, etc.)
http://headache-help.org

Great Ormond Street Hospital: Chronic Pain Fact SheetThis website provides a brief overview of chronic pain. It also provides a useful, downloadable fact sheet. If you would like to learn about a specific type of chronic pain, you can search for it on this website using the “Search Medical Conditions” section.
http://www.gosh.nhs.uk/medical-conditions/search-for-medical-conditions/chronic-pain/chronic-pain-information/?__utma=1.110866651.1355429264.1355429264.1355429264.1&__utmb=1.12.9.1355429476741&__utmc=1&__utmx=-&__utmz=1.1355429264.1.1.utmcsr=ucl.ac.uk|utmccn=(referral)|utmcmd=referral|utmcct=/ich/homepage&__utmv=-&__utmk=52559784

Video and Audio

1. This is a video recording of Dr. Elliot Krane, professor at Stanford University. In this video, Dr. Krane briefly touches on what is going on in the nervous system of children with chronic pain. This is a great video for anyone who is looking to better understand what goes on physiologically with CHRONIC PAIN.
http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/elliot_krane_the_mystery_of_chronic_pain.html

2. This is a very useful interview conducted with Dr. Leora Kuttner, an expert in the field of pediatric pain management. She covers such topics as the relationship between fear and breathing, the different treatment strategies that prove effective for children of different ages, and the role of emotions in chronic pain conditions.
http://lifeafterpain.com/info/expert-interviews/managing-pain-interview-with-doctor-leora-kuttner/

3. No Fears, No Tears (1985) and No Fears, No Tears, 13 Years Later (1998) are two documentaries directed by Dr. Leora Kuttner, an expert in pediatric pain management. The documentaries exam pediatric pain management in the primary healthcare setting and film as Dr. Kuttner introduces families to effective self-management strategies for pediatric pain.

Books

Conquering Your Child’s Chronic Pain: A Pediatrician’s Guide for Reclaiming a Normal Childhood, by Lonnie K. Zeltzer, Christina Blackett Schlank (2005). This is a very popular book designed for parents but provides useful information about chronic pain for teachers as well.

Healing Images for Children: Teaching Relaxation and Guided Imagery to Children Facing Cancer and Other Serious Illness, by Nancy Klein. This book presents relaxation techniques, describes medical interventions at a child’s level of comprehension, and tells stories to teach ways to reduce pain and stress. The first section is for adults and the second section is for kids.

A Boy and a Bear: The Children’s Relaxation Book, by Lori Lite. Written for ages 3-10, this book teaches kids how to relax and calm themselves through an engaging story.

Cool Cats, Calm Kids: Relaxation and Stress Management for Young People, by Mary L. Williams. The author uses cat behaviour to help demonstrate relaxation strategies and stress management techniques for young people ages 7-12.

Pain in Infants, Children, and Adolescents, by Neil Schechter, Charles Berde and
Myron Yaster. This is a very popular text used by a range of professionals who work with children and adolescents with chronic pain conditions.